Monday, 30 June 2008

Research blogging


Research Blogging helps you locate and share academic blog posts about peer-reviewed research. Bloggers use this icon to identify their thoughtful posts about serious research, and those posts are collected here for easy reference

New edition of Martini: Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology


The 8th edition of Martini's Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2009) is now available in the Short Loan Collection.


LOCATION CALL # STATUS
Kevin St. Short Loan 612 AVAILABLE
Kevin St. Short Loan 612 AVAILABLE
Kevin St. Short Loan 612 AVAILABLE
Kevin St. Short Loan 612 AVAILABLE




Friday, 27 June 2008

Get a little sun this summer.......if you can!!


Studies increasingly are suggesting the value of vitamin D – often known as the sunshine vitamin, because that’s one way you can obtain it – in everything from bone metabolism to maintaining muscle strength, immune function, reducing hypertension and possibly even playing a role in prevention of cancer and autoimmune disease.Studies increasingly are suggesting the value of vitamin D – often known as the sunshine vitamin, because that’s one way you can obtain it – in everything from bone metabolism to maintaining muscle strength, immune function, reducing hypertension and possibly even playing a role in prevention of cancer and autoimmune disease. Read article from ScienceDaily at

Thursday, 12 June 2008

SEI publications on the web


SEI provides a range of publications covering all aspects of sustainable energy, from factsheets and leaflets to case studies and reports to case studies and reports.

Wednesday, 11 June 2008


How will climate change affect Ireland?
Read the latest research report Ireland in a Warmer World.

A pdf file is available for download from Met Eireann http://www.met.ie/publications/warmerworld.asp.



Whr r u ?


A new study suggests that people, regardless of travel habits, follow the same general patterns of motion, spending the bulk of their time in a few favorite spots. The conclusions, obtained by tracking thousands of mobile phone users, could help researchers devise more accurate models of disease outbreaks.

Human travel routines affect how a virus will spread during an epidemic. But monitoring large numbers of people isn't easy. A 2006 study using hundreds of thousands of dollar bills as surrogates found that a typical bill circulated within a small area but could also travel long distances when its owner went on a trip or vacation (ScienceNOW, 25 January 2006). It wasn't clear whether this pattern reflected the movements of individuals, however, because a dollar bill can easily change hands.

So physicist Albert-László Barabási and his team turned to the most ubiquitous of human accessories: the cell phone. They monitored 100,000 users for 6 months and recorded the location of the cell phone tower that transmitted each call or text message. Read about their findings @ http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2008/604/2

Tuesday, 10 June 2008

Web of Science Research Buzz


New research resources via Web of Science include:

InCites: a behind-the-scenes look at highly cited research with interviews, essays and rankings Science Watch: a subscription newsletter (plus CD) that uses the unique citation data of Thomson Scientific to provide rankings, interviews, and reports on today's significant science.
Sci-Bytes weekly updates in the hottest new research
ESI Special Topics
KnowledgeLink Newsletter: featuring articles on hot topics in scientific, research information, intellectual property information.
Essays and White Papers

See Web of Science database resource @ http://www.dit.ie/DIT/library/resources/databases/index.html or contact Kevin St Library at kst.library@dit.ie

Tuesday, 3 June 2008

Digital forensics- is seeing really believing?


History is riddled with the remnants of photographic tampering. Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Mussolini, Castro and Brezhnev each had photographs manipulated—from creating more heroic-looking poses to erasing enemies or bottles of beer. In Stalin’s day, such phony images required long hours of cumbersome work in a darkroom, but today anyone with a computer can readily produce fakes that can be very hard to detect.

For the full article on image manipulation see Scientific American June 2008.